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gunman who tried to assassinate her for being an outspoken supporter of education for girls. she was 15 years old. during this next event hosted by politics and prose bookstore this -- malala yousafzai was interviewed by her father by michele martin of npr. this is about an hour. a [applause] >> this is breaking the quaker tradition but i want to start by quoting a very smart journalist friend of mine who's said in this country we have it all wrong, we stand up for judges that's it for teachers. let me say again we stand up for judges but we sit for teachers. i would like to review think about it if they do their jobs properly it is less likely we will need those judges so if you don't mind, if you don't mind i would ask if the educator's here would stand so the we may honor you properly for the bush -- the work that you do. [applause] >> and to be sure you are properly recognized, the head of my children's school is here with two of her colleagues. i don't know why you are hiding but we are glad you are here so that being said welcome to you both, we are happy to see you and you are he
died. >>> the way people get an education is changing radically. the internet has made the traditional classroom or lecture hall unnecessary. one nonprofit group is offering children in the developing world and elsewhere a chance to receive a first-rate education free. the concept is catching on with top-notch schools. >> the american nonprofit organization ignited the growth of free online classes. the founder has recorded all kinds of educational videos. they include math, physics, and art and history. the videos are free. >> just because people like, i think, the conversational tone. >> this video help s students learn basic addition. >> so we go one, two, three, four. we ended up at 7. that was our answer. >> it has been played more than two million times. altogether, there are around 5,000 videos. most are for elementary and junior high school students. khan used to be an analyst for a hedge fund. then, young relatives in distant places asked him to teach them arithmetic. so he made a video and posted it on the web. that was how he started his career in online education. people fo
and an improvement in the education system. >> can the government actually come up with bold policies if these vested interests actually come up against opposition? >> well, what is happening in china right now, the leaders in beijing are trying to leverage the state council's recent proposal to try to consolidate and amplify public opinion ahead of the meeting that's supposed to reform. we're pretty skeptical these measures will be adequately addressed in a four-day weekend, but we're convinced china can achieve a consumer-driven economy. we believe policies next week that would address the social security system, to address the family registration system and the land right policies will help china move forward on its economic rebalancing act. >> the third plenary session will begin on saturday next week in beijing. >>> japan's new car sales rose in october for the second straight month. that was due to strong demand for mini vehicles and introduction of new hybrid models. auto industry officials say sales totalled more than 420,000 vehicles last month, up 17% year on year. auto sales had been slowi
a month to about two weeks. visa seekers who work in fields such as business, education, and culture no longer have to submit invitation letters issued by the russian government. multiple entry visas will also be extended from one to three years. the number of japanese firms that have made inroads into russia has more than doubled in the last ten years. and the japanese foreign ministry says it expects that trend to gather speed. >>> iran's supreme leader has backed his president's push for nuclear negotiations. 8 toll ayatollah khomenei warned hard-liners not to accuse president rouhani of compromising with the united states. he recalled the seizure in 1979 of the u.s. embassy in iran. he said young irann called the embassy a den of spies. he said they were ahead of their time after recent allegations about u.s. intelligence activities. but he said no one should consider iranian negotiators as compromisers. they'll resume nuclear talks on thursday with their counterparts from six world powers, including the u.s. >> translator: these negotiators are on a difficult mission, and they'r
on children. nearly 3 million are at risk. many lack safe drinking water, health care and education. 2 out of 3 children have had to leave school. more than 1 million have fled the country with their families. 2 out of 5 of those children have no access to education. >>> now together in this studio is edward chiban, unicef's director for emergency programs. he's in charge of coordinating assistance in and outside of the country. thank you for coming to the studio today. you have just heard those numbers. what's the reality behind them? >> well, the reality behind those numbers is really children are at the center of this crisis. we have over 4 million that have been directly affected by the conflict. that's more than twice the population of tokyo's children. imagine, each one of them affected by the conflict. we're talking about children that no long ver access to health services, that have not been immunized in two years. children that have dropped out of school. we estimate inside syria more than 2 million children have dropped out of education. and behind those numbers, each of these ch
. unicef says many lack safe drinking water, health care and education. two out of three children have had to leave school. more than a million have fled the country with their families, two out of five of those children have no access to education. cases of polio have been reported in the country's eastern province. the head of unicef's emergency coordination says they have just started an immunization campaign but they don't know if they can >> the most urgent right now is to access those children both inside syria and subregion with health services, making sure those health services can go crossline to reach children wherever they are. >> reporter: with increasingly fractious opposition groups dividing the country, the number of children with no access to outside support is on the rise. but the apparently successful mission of u.n. chemical weapons inspectors inside syria has given some hope to humanitarian aid groups, including unicef. >> the importance of advocating with those with influence on the parties to the conflict, to allow access for humanitarian aid workers, the chemical wea
was going on on the ground. an urban city well-educated and libyans have exploded with access to soft loans over the internet. of the kids were getting shot as they tried to move around the cities so they began to use gugler and android sell funds to plot the locations of the snipers shooting at them. they would put pins in the map don't go down that street. the french start to see these pins appearing on buglers. so they flew reconnaissance mission so then they obviously started to bomb those positions when the school kids realize to free-market the french will baum it they went out to mark every position they could find and then whenever destroyed they would take them down and disappear from to coerce. -- google immerse a crowd source synchronized bombing a system that the pentagon spent billions of dollars the school kids are on the ground because they have access to connectivity that would have been impossible three of four years ago. as far as i can tell talking to kids on the ground those on the french task force at no time did they ever talk to each other it was self synchronized bas
and in colorado voters will decide whether to raise state income taxes to boost education funding and also whether to tax recreational marijuana. joining us now to talk about these measures are megan verlee of colorado public radio and enrique cerna of kcts in seattle. welcome to you both. enrique cerna, let's talk about this again et ceteraically modified food initiative. this is about labeling, is that what it is? >> yes, it is. it is initiative 522. it would require the labeling of genetically modified foods on to products. what is interesting about this is that there's a lot of controversy over what is exempt and not exempt. and that's one of the things that the opponents of the initiative point out. and they say that they claim that it's a poorly written initiative. and that some items, some dairy products, some meat products, others would not be, would not apply to this. others would. so they think that this is going to add a lot of confusion. they also are against this because they feel that it is going to cost the consumer more money, whatever labeling that has to be done. would be sent do
for guilt is the norm at nearly all colleges. in 2011, the department of education ruled preponderance of the evidence is the right standard. it means that colleges require only a fraction more than 50% belief in guilt. they found him guilty banning him from campus for at least three years. >> i broke down and i was crying. you know, i was just devastated. so we walk out of the door, and i remember i dropped to my knees, and that's when i really lost it just started balling. >> i would not ever want to see my child looking the way that he looked. he alternated between rage and then he would just absolutely collapse down on the floor and just sob and sob and sob. >> they feared he might face even more serious consequences. >> so when i got found guilty at und, all of a sudden in my head the thought is if they found me guilty what is to stop a jury from finding me guilty and sending me to jail for 25 years to life. >> were you worried about the stigma? >> horribly. we didn't tell anybody. not even my family. >> the grand forks police department investigated the complaint. but a detective
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >> i'm candy crowley in washington with a check of headlines. new details about the shooting rampage at los angeles international airport. federal authorities say suspected gunman paul ciancia shot tsa officer gerardo hernandez multiple times at pointblank range, went up an escalator and then returned to shoot hernandez again. earlier on cnn's "state of the union," michael mccaul described what police found as a suicide note and said mental illness was a chief reason behind the shooting. the 23-year-old ciancia is currently hospitalized in police custody. he's charged with two felonies including the murder of a federal officer. terminal three at l.a.x. is open today. >>> secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east for meeting with u.s. allies. one of kerry's key missions is to smooth relations with saudi arabia which is upse
will be able to come. ine education system afghanistan, not just higher education. universities, the number that was given to me is so i don'ttuitive use it. in terms of the lower grades before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out to the been, 900,000ave boys in afghan schools ten or so.ago now 8 million students in schools. about 3 million of those are girls. none of whom could have been educated before we got there allies.r in 2001, under the taliban were 20,000 teachers, all male. now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. healthcare many improved. significantlyty down. refugeeslion afghan who fled to pakistan have returned home. that 67% of the a mostan people in recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? the picture is much, number.tter than that i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. that the press has story. a good it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. our peoplesion that either.sn't come from it comes from what
constructive on the united states and where we spend a great deal of time is our educational system, which unfortunately a lot of people malign that today. this will be discussed later, but we actually have more students overseas than any other country in our educational system. what you come here? it is not just the quality of education, but the type of education. some of the disadvantages of education globally, so many people are taught rote or talk facts. this may work very well or testing scores, and i'm not trying to diminish that at all. but i do believe that the advantage of the american style of learning, which should get more credit, is the ability to be thoughtful and critical thinking. as an employer who hired 1100 employees this year, i will tell you over 80% of our employees come from u.s. universities. we will continue to have that position. as an employer who has offices in 38 countries, the bulk of our employees come from the united states universities, and what we are looking for, people who know how to think and think creatively. >> thank you, larry. let's shift to bill.
basics of drawing and handicraft. the committee organises exhibitions and educational centres for children who enjoy taking part and click to draw. we were shocked to discover how much the children have been effected by the war in syria. for example, a lot of the kids will draw pictures of cemeteries with the names of their loved ones on the tombstones. they have made boxes for detainees in which the children put bread. they have been shown ways of making bread, cracking firewood and how to wash things. >> we haven't had electricity for 15 months. we do the activities manually - like weaving wool, for example. women use wool to knit sweaters and hats which they swell to make a living, keeping in mind that because of the government siege wool is not allowed in any more. we organised a first aid workshop. every house needs someone trained in basic medical care. no one knows when their house will be shelled. we'll continue our efforts and work until our last breath to provide support and help our people. i'm convinced god will bless those who have mercy on earth. >> a bus caught
system, our education system, our access to energy, could make this a platform that every country around the world wants to be in. and growth here at home. >> we will close down. thank you so much for all of thoughts. well done. [ applause ] >> tonight, on c-span. armed services committee chairman senator carl levin inlks about the situation afghanistan. followed by remarks from obama and prime minister of iraq nouri themaliki and remarks at antidefamanion league. week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman about improvements in the country as the u.s. and prepare to remove troops from afghanistan in 2014. from the council on foreign relations. is an hour. >> welcome to the foreign relations. i'm johnathan karl. a high honor to be here with levin. introduction.s no interduck carl levin is the chairman of the senate armed services from the great state of michigan and of special interest to me, just back from a trip to afghanistan where he commanders over there and also had a one on one president karzai. i
the excellence in u.s. higher education, how that helped us, training more and better engineers, but those days are ending. so our natural design advantages are going to be harder to come by going forward. and so we need those things, so we are not starting with a 10% cost disadvantage. >> in asia. what would it mean for caterpillar? >> we have a huge business in asia and growing. that is the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to be that market. but again, i come back to the point that it is likely that a lot of those countries, a number of those, will do agreements with or without us. if we don't get tpp done. we will look into a market that we ought to be competing with. i'll move to africa because i am passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they've come in with their own financing, their own engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals, extraction, oil and gas, hydroelectric power across africa. i know, michael, that is on your agenda. but i am so pleased to hear that the crossover between commerce and the state,
. >> bad. >> jon: got it. bible good, education baaaad. wait a minute, what if a student wants a loan to go to bible school school? brain freeze! but, of course, msnbc sometimes asks as well but sarcastically. >> wisconsin has been losing jobs for six straight months since walker's budget went into effect. ask yourself the question is that a good thing or a bad thing. >> we've seen for the record 21 straight months of private sector growth. mr. romney is that a good thing or a bad thing. if the government today stops a pennsylvania pool from kicking out black kids is in a a good thing or bad thing? >> jon: the answer to all three are what are you (bleep) stupid? but cnn, they genuinely seem not to know. good thing, bad thing? they really don't know. so much so that sometimes they have to use their phone-a-friend lifeline. >> good thing or bad thing to shut the federal government down for a few days. seven in ten americans say a bad thing. nearly six in ten americans say it's a bad thing. nearly 4-10 say it would be a good thifnlg remember that. >> jon: but also remember this. nearly six in
just to get them to classes. educators have not tried this and don't know yet if it will help. a lot are paying attention. >> there's a different early morning buzz in anchorage schools - more hustle at ag diamond's high to avoid the tardy table. perfect attendance means more? >> kids are talking about it. community members are talking about it. i hear it on radio. >> they are talking about the free car, the $24,000 prize for being here every day. >> a free car, that's a reason to get out of bed and come to school. >> only juniors and seniors like carlie and nicky have a chance. winning is not a teenage pie in the sky fantasy. what are the odds? they are not that bad. there's about 3200 juniors and seniors in the district. last year 182 had perfect attendance. perfect means perfect. no missed school days for any reason. it gets you into a drawing for the free wheels donated by autodealer troy jarvis who came up with the idea. he admits it's a good advertising gymic, but hopes insent vicing attendance can teach kids a lesson. outside the classroom in the world of work you have to sho
a better education and if you can be more creative, you'll do better and if you don't, then unfortunately you're going to be struggling. >> what are you worried about when you look at new york after bloomberg? what are you worried about being undone or a legacy of government that will be perhaps eroded? >> i think most of the things we've done hopefully if we've done a good job will stay in place. yesterday i was in london. the weather was nice. you think better of any city when the sun is shining. but london is a real competitor to new york. and we've got to understand if we were to stop improving, stop diversifying, stop investing, we will get pushed back and other places will take over. i was in paris the day before. i had dinner with some people all of whom talked about their friends moving out of paris and out of france because tax rates are so high. those are people that will create jobs and pay taxes down the road. you can't hold the waves from coming in. you have to keep making society open and you have to keep providing opportunities. if you start to focus on equal results rather
(footballnames.ecl) environment especially for a young children that they get good education, and in afghanistan it's impossible for the kids, especially for the one who is working with the american for their kids it's impossible to goe go to the schools or kindergarten to get education. but for here there is no more fear of taliban to get my children or harm my children. i you can sen can send them to s or kindergarten for a good education. >> i saw somewhere you said that in afghanistan they would learn to hold guns. here they will learn to hold a pencil and paper. >> yeah. janis when he got off the plane last night i asked him, what does this mean to you? my kids instead of having to learn how to predict and defend -- protect and defend themselves, when they go to school they will be taught to hold a pen and pencil and piece of paper. >> janis welcom well to welcomed states. >> straight ahead the surprising pick for the most powerful person in the world. and mariel hemingway talks about millions who need assistance now. we appreciate you spending time with us tonight. >>> up next is the golde
. the education system and afghanistan. so many of them, the number given to them is counterintuitive. so i do not use it. in terms of the lower grades, before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out, to the extent they have been, 900,000 boys. now a million students in school . 3 million of those are girls. none of those who could've been educated before we got there with our allies. were 20,000e teachers, all male. is now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. health care much improved. child mortality significantly down. afghan refugees who fled pakistan have returned home. how is it that 67% of the american people recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? because the picture is much, much better than that number. i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe that the press has missed a good story. it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. the impression that our people get doesn't come from either. it comes from what they
for education including an early education initiative. the republican budget in the house results in the cutting 20% below sequester levels to that part of the budget that funds education. the office tells us the act cuts to defense and priorities result in 800,000 american fewer jobs by this time next year. we know there's smarter ways to achieve deficit reduction without economic harm. in the house, there's a balanced mix of cuts to wasteful spending and cuts to unproductive special interest tax breaks. we've been denied the opportunity to vote on that plan. finally, this committee should continue our work to reduce our long term deaf fits and shrink the debt. over the last few years, we cut the deficit by over 2 #.7 trillion excluding the sequester. three quarters of the savings come from budget cuts, one quarter from revenue. if you factor in the additional trillion dollars in savings resulting from slower than expected health care costs, which are due in part to changes in the affordable care act, the ratio of cuts to revenue is more than 4-to-1. still, we can and should do more, but there
educated work force, our low-energy costs, our abundant energy, our stable financial markets, our rule of law, strong intellectual property protection and so much more. that's why he launched the select u.s.a. program. the first ever federal effort to welcome additional investment to the united states. we've been very busy ever since, supporting both investors and economic development leaders as they make deals worth millions and even billions of dollars. we at the commerce department are horned to run this program that welcomes your investment and is helping create jobs. ladies and gentlemen, america is open for business. open for your business. president obama and i could not be more supportive of the investments you have made and will make here in the united states. please join me in welcoming my friend, the 44th president of the united states, barack obama. \[applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you. please have a seat. to my great friend, penny, thank you for the kind words, but more importantly, thank you for your outstanding leadership, for bringing us all together
mitigated conflicts across a rack -- across iraq. why would with the foundations of civic education and human rights for the institutions of education. u.s. ap is part of the partnerships we we have made. a lot remains to be done in iraq. the road ahead will not the easy. your excellency, we assure you and the iraqi people that as a rock prepares for the 2016 elections, iraq can count on the support of the u.s. institute of peace is a partner on all levels. starting with the communities, to local councils, two dialogues. thank you. [applause] >> i would like to ask beth jones to come forward. the format today will be an introduction of the prime minister by ambassador beth jones. then the prime minister will speak. and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps he of written them out, we are not going to have time for a great number of questions, but hopefully the prime minister will find questions interesting. with that, libby turn it over. >> thank you very much. welcome to the delegation. especially welcome, it is great to be here
the task of giving kids an equal education. -- dedicated to accomplishing the task of giving kids an equal education. they said they were going to back off of strong civil rights enforcement. i had to make a decision. do i uphold the law or back off of my principal? ini fight for what i believe or do i sacrifice my job? i lost my job. but i have never regretted the decision is standing for what you believe in. [applause] i went back to monterey and public service was still in my veins so i ran for congress and served a terms of the congress. eight terms. it was a different congress. el.er tip o'neill, bob michae we just honored tom foley the other day, speaker and a majority leader. republicans and democrats work together. toy work together to try solve the problems facing this country. yes, they had their differences. yes, they had their politics. when it came to issues affecting the country, they worked together for the common good and that's the way our democracy should work. [applause] clinton asked me then to take over the office of management and budget. the good people there helped
in getting it into the education system and am wondering if you could talk about that along with the press that we need to get people interested because it's all about selling new ideas. we don't talk about complexity. we live in a complex system. finally, last night i saw a play called "love in afghanistan." i think it's one of the most powerful plays of ever seen and i'm a performing arts junkie. i recommend everyone to go see it. it was fabulous. it addresses the things were talking about. >> it's a really important point. somebody brought over some young afghan music students about six months ago. it was terrific. we brought them to the capital so that some of my colleagues could see. i think there were like eight students on afghan instruments at a music school which could have never existed and they are there preserving their heritage. it has an impact when people can see a play or whatever, of course it does. telling stories are important. the problem on the other side is i'm not a good storyteller, by the way. i admire those of my colleagues who are. it's the most powerful way to g
's what i represent, in florida we are doing 3,000 education seminars from the beginning of september through the end of march, making sure that people understand what their options are. we're in all 67 counties, we built retail centers, we're reaching out to our customers so they understand what their choices are. and we believe people will find choices there that work. >> my question is, will people pay more? >> people who are subsidized are probably going to have the opportunity to pay less. it really is an individualized issue. and there may be some people who pay more, but it really depends on your individual circumstances. >> you met at the white house with senior aides going through this obama carroe rollout. as an insurance executive, you signed up basically for a deal here, which is to say, okay, we'll cover people who have preexisting conditions. we'll do that if you can deliver us some more business. give us younger, healthier people who probably aren't going to need our insurance, and that's how we'll make money and balance out the fact we're going to pay more out, coverin
detailed party solutions on issues like energy, education, health care, on growing the private sector economy. we need to win the war of ideas. prime minister thatcher said you've got to win the war, the debate of ideas before you can win the next election. we've got to be more than the party of no. our country's got a critical decision to make. myÑi generationÑi needs to choose again to renew principles of freedom to say the american dream and prosperity is a path forward. president obama is offering more government. >> we're running out of money. give me an example. don't get wonky. a new fresh conservative proposal we're not hearing now that you think would be more attractive to one of these groups that is not voting republican right now. >> i think you see a lot of creativity around education reform at the state level, whether it's giving letter grades to public schools, holding teachers accountable based on student growth in terms of how they're learning, in terms of school choice or the dollars follow the students andÑi public schools, on-line schools, private schools, indepe
a security guard and that's the persona of safety. >> reporter: the u.s. department of education under title 9 of the civil rights acts says institutions receiving federal funds must insure an education free of sexual discrimination. many colleges and universities say they weren't unaware of their legal obligations under title 9 to also protect students from sexual assault. >> we absolutely put much more emphasis on preventing plagiarism than preventing rape. that is a reality. >> reporter: annie graduated and in 2012 she and andrea found each other. they began to talk about the issue of rape at the university of north carolina. >> unc is not a bad place. it's representation of a larger cultural problem. >> reporter: the women began researching title 9, interfering other victims of rape, utilizing social media, and in january o of 2013 a lot of within former unc administrator melinda manning and two others they filed a federal complaint against the university of north carolina at the department of education. >> when you have 18- and 19-year-old men and women who are holding the government ac
impoverished poorly educated and rural girls are more likely to become pregnant. early preg nansies reflect powerlessness, poverty and pressure. in most cases the results of sexual vialance and owe -- voilens and coercion. for thousands of girls teenage preg nansies results in human rights violations - that is death. >> 70,000 die from causes relating to pregnancy and child birth. we have this report from a shelter in nairobi that has been helping underage mother. >> at the age of 14 this girl is a mother. her family disowned her. she is now forced to care for a 4-month-old and studying for school exams. >> translation: i'm lucky i had a safe delivery. i haven't lost hope. i plan to continue my studies until i complete them. >> beth now lives at the shelter for teenage mothers, outside nairobi. it's run by this man. the rever and. >> 99" of girls we have here are from poor families. por erty plays a great role whereby the families are poor, and you bring another mouth. you go away. >> teenage preg nansies in africa contributed to a lack of sex education. child marriage prevalent in some co
and i were on education. >> it wasn't that, kill the mood. we have pulitzer please historian john meacham. are you going to do the jonas brothers right now? >> i did it earlier. i proofread it. no one proofread the jonas brothers. >> that's a shame. msnbc visiting analyst. former democratic congressman harold ford, jr. good morning. and in washington, we have senior political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. sam, the piece of paper in front of you. look at that. he comes with pages. >> you know why he got the notes from? >> where? >> his plummer yesterday, he gave him the details. how did it go? >> is everything working with the dishwasher okay? >> no, it's not. >> everything is hysterical. >> now would be a good time for you to tell the audience, actually, your plummer works for the obama administration. willie, do you believe all spoold up mia was yesterday. everything was going fine, ten she showed up on set, whew. i'd like to apologize. >> i said something that actually made sense and joe just -- >> more impressions today? >> maybe. . ma
to the future, we need to make it stronger by improving worker training and education, upgrading our infrastructure, and growing our manufacturing base. the truth is, there are additional things we can add and do to make america even stronger as a magnet for investment. before talking about what make ours economy such an attractive place to invest, and what we plan to do to make it even more atrabtive, i'd like to start by saying a few words about the state of the world economy. there's broad evidence of recovery across the global landscape. economic conditions, particularly in advanced economies, have improved, but there's no doubt that global command is not where it needs to be. in too many countries, unemployment levels are unacceptably high, especially among young people. as i said before, leaders around the world should make strengthening demand and creating jobs a priority to unlock growth that's robust, sustainable, and balanced. looking at europe, it seems the long recession is slowly fading even as critical steps have been taken to restore financial stability. this is good n
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> today senate homeland committee took a look at tragic naval yard shooting and security clearances. bipartisan group of senators working on a solution that strengthens that system. claire mccaskill has been one of the lawmakers leading the fray. floor, you have the first hearing ongoing and you've been pushing on this company, spinoff from the government that does most of the security clearances. there was a governm
of the reporters interviewing these customers, these citizens, is that they need to educate themselves. journalism is an educational process. as a reporter you have to educate yourself and then you teach to the best of your ability your readers or viewers as to what you learned. the reporter is who put these people on the air or quote them in newspaper articles aren't doing that. they basically have someone -- they are following a narrative and narrative is people are suffering sticker shock and they get somebody who says, well, geez, i'm going to pay a lot higher premiums, i have sticker shock and that's the furthest the reporter goes and that's really not competent or responsible journalism when you keep in mind that premiums people pay is just part of the cost of insurance and medical care so nobody in the press or on the air seems to be looking at this saying, well, what do you get for that premium? what are costs going to be if you get sick and how much better are you going to be with obama care compliant plan that's got limited deductibles, limited out-of-pocket expenses, free preventative t
disputes across iraq. we also put a foundation of civic education, human rights, and religious moderation for the institutions of education. usip and its partners are proud of the progress we have made. we also recognize a lot remains to be done in iraq, and we see from the unfortunate tragic violence that has still cost many lives the road ahead will not be easy. your excellency, we assure you and the iraqi people that as iraq prepare for the 2014 elections and faces challenges to a secure better future for the people, iraq and kept on the support of the u.s. institute for peace for a partner on all levels, starting with the community, two local councils, to international dialogue. thank you. >> i would like to ask the ambassador to come forward. the format today will be an introduction -- it will be an introduction of the prime minister by the ambassador, and then the prime minister will speak and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps you have already written them out, we will not have time for a great number of questions, and hopef
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